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Citroen CC Autonomous Vehicle Car Design Sketch

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Problem:

A city car is a moderately powered car intended for use in inner city areas, are used in mixed traffic environments and in all weather conditions. The city car needs to be efficient in carrying out the task of transporting the people to their destination, using up as little space as possible. The Department for Transport released a report in 2005 stating there were (in 2005) over 32,000,000 vehicles on the roads in the UK alone, over 28,000,000 of those were cars. This number of cars will be a problem in the future as the DfT forecast that car numbers will double towards the latter part of this century.

Congestion and over population in cities will eventually lead to living space being built upwards. Cars, until they can fly, will need to be built inwards. The primary aim for this project is to create a sustainable solution to over pollution and congestion situation towns and cities will face in 2036 and beyond.

Solution:

The Citroen CC (City Car) 2036 is an autonomous vehicle that is part of a transportation service I created to do three things; (1) eliminate inner city congestion; (2) provide thousands of easily accessible jobs; (3) remove the need for oil (oils, tyres, fuels etc). All in a package that is superfast to manufacture.

Citroen CC Autonomous Vehicle Car Design Sketch

Passengers will order the vehicle (wheelchair accessible x2) to pick them up from a mobile device, where at the same time payment is made without the use of a credit card or cash. While the owners of the vehicle are at work, the driverless CC (or fleet of CC's) can be sent out into the town or city to be reliably used by commuters 24/7 (no more parked cars/car parks).

Passengers have a seating area of 58cm x 80cm each which is more than on most current trains, planes or taxis, and two cars can fit along side each other in one lane. This means traffic jams are less than a quarter in length than if the same amount of people were commuting in Smart cars.

The car uses a developing and working technology called plasmagnetic levitation. The technology works similar to a maglev system only it does not require a track. Instead, the vehicle hovers over a magnetically charged plasma created by UV lazers and an alternating magnetic feild on the vehicle that together create levitation. These units are calibrated on the fly in different ways to produce breaking, changes of direction and propulsion/reverse.

Mention car of the future and most people think of hybrids and alternative fuels. But with traffic congestion expected to double by the latter part of this century, city planners, the DfT and even NASA are beginning to consider flying cars as a viable solution. The Citroen CC is designed towards a future transportation system that no longer relies on or needs tyres, oil or fuel.

Owners will make their money from both the fares of passengers and also by using the flat outer sides of the vehicle as advertising space, like a mini billboard. The advertising will allow the fare costs to be kept down, incentivising commuters to use the vehicles (increasing market share and growth), instead of using a costly, inefficient orthodox car they'd need to park, where it would remain stationary for most of its life, unused. And the passive income and easily accessible nature of ownership incentivises new owners to buy and lease them to send out for passengers to use to begin with. Owners can be at work or on holiday while their CC (or fleet of) is out there making them money. Taxi drivers will also be kept in work via franchising.

Citroen CC Autonomous Vehicle Car Design 1/4 Scale Model

The CC has brought together a number of sustainable values to produce the ultimate sustainable vehicle. So, the idea is that it's much more than an autonomous taxi service, eventually more and more people will be opting in to the CC and its system as oppsed to buying a costly othodox car, thus elimitation congestion.

Feedback by Professor Ian Walsh, Director of the Institute for Sustainable Design:

"As a designer Richard has developed a very distinctive style and attitude. He is a very thoughtful individual who adopts a holistic approach to addressing design briefs. In addressing design issues Richard has always sought out the most innovative solutions. His approach extends beyond the obvious as exemplified by the fact that he presented his Design Ethics paper at a very prestigious international design conference in Germany in 2007 - the only one working at his level to do so".

halo - The World's First Accessible Wind Resistant Umbrella

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Problem:

Umbrellas have been around for nearly 3500 years. Firstly, the Egyptians produced them to protect us from the sun, then 500 years later China waterproofed the canopies to keep us dry. But only in the last few years have umbrellas been designed so they're wind resistant.

The world's umbrella suppliers say more than 7 million umbrellas are sold each year in the UK, and most of those are small, with a closed length of under 30cm that people do not want to spend more than £10 on. This is the mass market. So these small umbrellas selling for under £10 need to last longer if we are to stop wasting so much material. Same story in the US where over 35 million umbrellas are sold annually.

There isn't a wind resistant umbrella that is small and light targeted at this mass market on sale anywhere today. The cheapest one is over double the most expensive end of the mass market, and those wind resistant umbrellas that are closer to the mass market and lower in price, are too big and too heavy to put in a pocket or bag.

Solution:

To modify a standard small, inexpensive, light umbrella to render it wind resistant without changing or adding any of the materials, and without adding any extra time on the production line.

The halo™ uses the materials currently being used in ordinary umbrellas to make it wind resistant, taking inspiration from the Apollo 13 mission when crew members had to come up with a solution with only the materials they had on board.

halo - The World's First Accessible Wind Resistant Umbrella

The halo™ is 'The World's First Accessible Wind Resistant Umbrella' because: (1) it's genuinely wind resistant; (2) retails for under ten pounds; (3) small enough to fit in your bag. No other umbrella ticks all these boxes.

This umbrella was made to reduce the millions of umbrellas that are made, shipped, and thrown away each year by giving an ordinary umbrella a longer lifecycle and making it wind resistant. Patented in 16 countries, so far.

Feedback by world's largest umbrella supplier:

"The best wind resistant umbrella we've ever seen".

copyright © Richard Heale